fuckedupyouthh:

Wes Anderson street art//

archiemcphee:

Spanish street artist Pejac (previously featured here) isn’t content with using details as inspiration for enhancing the urban landscape. He’s also used the windows inside his own home to create playful works of art, including a recent tribute to the 40th anniversary of French high-wire artist Philippe Petit’s legendary walk between the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City.

"Back in 2011, when he was living in Valencia, surrounded by surveillance cameras and without curtains to protect his privacy, Pejac started experimenting with paper and acrylic works on glass. He shared a couple of these earlier works with us, photographed by Paco Esteve. Feeling exposed and trapped inside his home, he started creating these as a way of fighting this lack of privacy. By using the view from his house as a backdrop for these miniature works, he created little urban art pieces in privacy of his living room."

Head over to Hi-Fructose for additional process photos.
[via Hi-Fructose]
archiemcphee:

Spanish street artist Pejac (previously featured here) isn’t content with using details as inspiration for enhancing the urban landscape. He’s also used the windows inside his own home to create playful works of art, including a recent tribute to the 40th anniversary of French high-wire artist Philippe Petit’s legendary walk between the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City.

"Back in 2011, when he was living in Valencia, surrounded by surveillance cameras and without curtains to protect his privacy, Pejac started experimenting with paper and acrylic works on glass. He shared a couple of these earlier works with us, photographed by Paco Esteve. Feeling exposed and trapped inside his home, he started creating these as a way of fighting this lack of privacy. By using the view from his house as a backdrop for these miniature works, he created little urban art pieces in privacy of his living room."

Head over to Hi-Fructose for additional process photos.
[via Hi-Fructose]
archiemcphee:

Spanish street artist Pejac (previously featured here) isn’t content with using details as inspiration for enhancing the urban landscape. He’s also used the windows inside his own home to create playful works of art, including a recent tribute to the 40th anniversary of French high-wire artist Philippe Petit’s legendary walk between the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City.

"Back in 2011, when he was living in Valencia, surrounded by surveillance cameras and without curtains to protect his privacy, Pejac started experimenting with paper and acrylic works on glass. He shared a couple of these earlier works with us, photographed by Paco Esteve. Feeling exposed and trapped inside his home, he started creating these as a way of fighting this lack of privacy. By using the view from his house as a backdrop for these miniature works, he created little urban art pieces in privacy of his living room."

Head over to Hi-Fructose for additional process photos.
[via Hi-Fructose]
archiemcphee:

Spanish street artist Pejac (previously featured here) isn’t content with using details as inspiration for enhancing the urban landscape. He’s also used the windows inside his own home to create playful works of art, including a recent tribute to the 40th anniversary of French high-wire artist Philippe Petit’s legendary walk between the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City.

"Back in 2011, when he was living in Valencia, surrounded by surveillance cameras and without curtains to protect his privacy, Pejac started experimenting with paper and acrylic works on glass. He shared a couple of these earlier works with us, photographed by Paco Esteve. Feeling exposed and trapped inside his home, he started creating these as a way of fighting this lack of privacy. By using the view from his house as a backdrop for these miniature works, he created little urban art pieces in privacy of his living room."

Head over to Hi-Fructose for additional process photos.
[via Hi-Fructose]
archiemcphee:

Spanish street artist Pejac (previously featured here) isn’t content with using details as inspiration for enhancing the urban landscape. He’s also used the windows inside his own home to create playful works of art, including a recent tribute to the 40th anniversary of French high-wire artist Philippe Petit’s legendary walk between the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City.

"Back in 2011, when he was living in Valencia, surrounded by surveillance cameras and without curtains to protect his privacy, Pejac started experimenting with paper and acrylic works on glass. He shared a couple of these earlier works with us, photographed by Paco Esteve. Feeling exposed and trapped inside his home, he started creating these as a way of fighting this lack of privacy. By using the view from his house as a backdrop for these miniature works, he created little urban art pieces in privacy of his living room."

Head over to Hi-Fructose for additional process photos.
[via Hi-Fructose]
archiemcphee:

Spanish street artist Pejac (previously featured here) isn’t content with using details as inspiration for enhancing the urban landscape. He’s also used the windows inside his own home to create playful works of art, including a recent tribute to the 40th anniversary of French high-wire artist Philippe Petit’s legendary walk between the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City.

"Back in 2011, when he was living in Valencia, surrounded by surveillance cameras and without curtains to protect his privacy, Pejac started experimenting with paper and acrylic works on glass. He shared a couple of these earlier works with us, photographed by Paco Esteve. Feeling exposed and trapped inside his home, he started creating these as a way of fighting this lack of privacy. By using the view from his house as a backdrop for these miniature works, he created little urban art pieces in privacy of his living room."

Head over to Hi-Fructose for additional process photos.
[via Hi-Fructose]
archiemcphee:

Spanish street artist Pejac (previously featured here) isn’t content with using details as inspiration for enhancing the urban landscape. He’s also used the windows inside his own home to create playful works of art, including a recent tribute to the 40th anniversary of French high-wire artist Philippe Petit’s legendary walk between the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City.

"Back in 2011, when he was living in Valencia, surrounded by surveillance cameras and without curtains to protect his privacy, Pejac started experimenting with paper and acrylic works on glass. He shared a couple of these earlier works with us, photographed by Paco Esteve. Feeling exposed and trapped inside his home, he started creating these as a way of fighting this lack of privacy. By using the view from his house as a backdrop for these miniature works, he created little urban art pieces in privacy of his living room."

Head over to Hi-Fructose for additional process photos.
[via Hi-Fructose]
archiemcphee:

Spanish street artist Pejac (previously featured here) isn’t content with using details as inspiration for enhancing the urban landscape. He’s also used the windows inside his own home to create playful works of art, including a recent tribute to the 40th anniversary of French high-wire artist Philippe Petit’s legendary walk between the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City.

"Back in 2011, when he was living in Valencia, surrounded by surveillance cameras and without curtains to protect his privacy, Pejac started experimenting with paper and acrylic works on glass. He shared a couple of these earlier works with us, photographed by Paco Esteve. Feeling exposed and trapped inside his home, he started creating these as a way of fighting this lack of privacy. By using the view from his house as a backdrop for these miniature works, he created little urban art pieces in privacy of his living room."

Head over to Hi-Fructose for additional process photos.
[via Hi-Fructose]
archiemcphee:

Spanish street artist Pejac (previously featured here) isn’t content with using details as inspiration for enhancing the urban landscape. He’s also used the windows inside his own home to create playful works of art, including a recent tribute to the 40th anniversary of French high-wire artist Philippe Petit’s legendary walk between the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City.

"Back in 2011, when he was living in Valencia, surrounded by surveillance cameras and without curtains to protect his privacy, Pejac started experimenting with paper and acrylic works on glass. He shared a couple of these earlier works with us, photographed by Paco Esteve. Feeling exposed and trapped inside his home, he started creating these as a way of fighting this lack of privacy. By using the view from his house as a backdrop for these miniature works, he created little urban art pieces in privacy of his living room."

Head over to Hi-Fructose for additional process photos.
[via Hi-Fructose]

archiemcphee:

Spanish street artist Pejac (previously featured here) isn’t content with using details as inspiration for enhancing the urban landscape. He’s also used the windows inside his own home to create playful works of art, including a recent tribute to the 40th anniversary of French high-wire artist Philippe Petit’s legendary walk between the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City.

"Back in 2011, when he was living in Valencia, surrounded by surveillance cameras and without curtains to protect his privacy, Pejac started experimenting with paper and acrylic works on glass. He shared a couple of these earlier works with us, photographed by Paco Esteve. Feeling exposed and trapped inside his home, he started creating these as a way of fighting this lack of privacy. By using the view from his house as a backdrop for these miniature works, he created little urban art pieces in privacy of his living room."

Head over to Hi-Fructose for additional process photos.

[via Hi-Fructose]